Skin Surgery

Skin cancer surgery
Skin surgery is an office procedure performed for both medically necessary and cosmetic indications to maintain the health, function and appearance of your skin. Skin surgery is used to remove skin cancers (such as Mohs micrographic surgery), moles, cysts, lipomas, and benign lesions such as skin tags and seborrhea keratoses. Office based skin surgery usually involves injection of local anesthesia prior to the procedure to assure patient comfort.

Skin Cancer Education

The same type of skin cancer can look very different from person to person. This makes it hard to look at a picture and tell if you have skin cancer. The best way to tell if you have skin cancer is to see a dermatologist. You should see a dermatologist right away for a skin cancer check if you see anything on your skin that lasts for 2 weeks or longer and is:

  • Growing
  • Changing shape
  • Bleeding or itching

These are signs of skin cancer. If it is caught early and removed, skin cancer has a high cure rate.

The most common cancer in the world.

More than 2 million cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year. And that’s just in the United States. Most Americans will have one of these skin cancers:
Basal cell carcinoma
Squamous cell carcinoma
Melanoma

If you suspect you have skin cancer, don’t wait.
Call our office: (831) 293-8458

BASAL CELL CARCINOMA

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer. More than two million cases of this skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year.

This skin cancer usually develops on skin that gets sun exposure, such as on the head, neck, and back of the hands. BCC is especially common on the face, often forming on the nose. It is possible to get BCC on any part of the body, including the trunk, legs, and arms. People who use tanning beds have a much higher risk of getting BCC. They also tend to get BCC earlier in life.

This type of skin cancer grows slowly. It rarely spreads to other parts of the body. Treatment is important because BCC can grow wide and deep, destroying skin tissue and bone.

SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common skin cancer in humans. About 700,000 new cases of this skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year.

This skin cancer tends to develop on skin that has been exposed to the sun for years. It is most frequently seen on sun-exposed areas, such as the head, neck, and back of the hands. Women frequently get SCC on their lower legs. It is possible to get SCC on any part of the body, including the inside of the mouth, lips, and genitals.

People who use tanning beds have a much higher risk of getting SCC. They also tend to get SCC earlier in life. SCC can spread to other parts of the body. With early diagnosis and treatment, SCC is highly curable.

MELANOMA

rrrMelanoma is a type of skin cancer. Anyone can get melanoma. When found early and treated, the cure rate is very high.

Allowed to grow, melanoma can spread to other parts of the body.
Melanoma can spread quickly.
When melanoma spreads, it can be deadly.

Dermatologists believe that the number of deaths from melanoma would be much lower if people:c

  • Knew the warning signs of melanoma.
  • Learned how to examine their skin for signs of skin cancer.
  • Took the time to examine their skin.

It’s important to take time to look at the moles on your skin because this is a good way to find melanoma early. When checking your skin, you should look for the ABCDEs of melanoma.

Signs of melanoma

The most common early signs (what you see) of melanoma are:

  • Growing mole on your skin.
  • Unusual looking mole on your skin or a mole that does not look like any other mole on your skin (the ugly duckling).
  • Non-uniform mole (has an odd shape, uneven or uncertain border, different colors).

If you see a mole or new spot on your skin that has any of the ABCDEs, immediately make an appointment to see a dermatologist.